Tag Archives: work

All Work and No Play

11 Oct

… makes me an uninspired, uncreative, dull, dull, dull girl.

Don’t get me wrong; I’m glad I have a job. Maybe even lucky. But lately, my job has left me completely drained – of energy, of time, of creativity, of inspiration. Every day, I go to office, put in eight hours (sometimes more) of my time, my energy, my talents, my heart, my mind, my LIFE.  And at the end of the day, I feel I am left with nothing but fatigue and frustration.  I have nothing left for God, for my husband, my friends, my family, even myself.

I know that part of the problem is my own perfectionism. It kills me to have to deal with mediocrity. (And that can almost be taken in a literal sense, as my intensely high daily stress level surely is doing nothing good for my health.) But every day, mediocrity is what I deal with. On top of that, the people I am surrounded with don’t seem to even notice it. So, every day, I take it upon myself to “cure” us (by us, I mean the media company I work for) of mediocrity. And I’ve realized that I CANNOT do that anymore. I can’t take it upon myself to “fix” everything. I just can’t.

I need balance. I need ME back. When I leave work, I need to LEAVE work. No more taking work home every weekend. No more stressing out during my vacation time and being unable to RELAX because I’m worried about this project, or that impossible deadline, or this article that I need to finish and to perfect. No more skipping workouts or turning down social invitations because I’m exhausted, because I’ve spent too much of myself on work, work, work. No more. I’m done. Done.

Well, until the next time I lose sight or my priorities and lose myself again. Help keep me accountable, will you?

Word of the Day: Ambulate

1 Apr

Ambulate

Function: intransitive verb
Inflected Form(s): am·bu·lat·ed; am·bu·lat·ing
Etymology: Latin ambulatus, past participle of ambulare
Date: circa 1623
: to move from place to place : walk

Why would you use the word “ambulate” when the word “walk” will work just fine, especially if you have already used the word “walk” to set up the sentence in which you use the word “ambulate”? The word “ambulate” does not add anything to your writing. I know in grammar school, we were all taught to use descriptive language and replace words like “walk” with flowery synonyms like “saunter,” “stomp,” and “lumber.” However, if “walk” works just fine and gets your point across, then just use “walk.” Don’t try to replace it with some random word that most people will have look up in the dictionary anyway. It’s pointless.
People who use unnecessarily complicated words in an attempt to come across as well-read, well-educated, intelligent, or whatever are just plain annoying, not to mention bombastic, grandiloquent, and possibly supercilious.
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From My Inbox: My Mom’s Last Wish

14 Mar
E-mails like this one I got today make my job both very difficult and very rewarding.  It’s hard when you know that a lot of the people who write for you may not have very much longer to live.  But it is also rewarding to know that you, if even in a small way, have made a difference in someone’s life.  This is from the son of a lady who wrote a small piece for the magazine: 
I want to thank you for all the prayers!
My family needs your prayers for peace, love, finances, relationship!
NO DOOM or GLOOM! My mom was positive to the end and peaceful!!! Very strong woman!
She wanted everyone to read her Article in a cancer magazine! See the attached PDF file!
One regret is that I never video taped her before it got bad. Please do this for your yourself, your kids, your grand kids, great grand kids!
Maybe write a letter to them before it is the end. State your wishes and directions for each person. Write your favorite things and why!
Have a wonderful day and week!
God bless you and Over flow your cup with love, peace, finances, joy, healing, happiness, relationships! Take care!
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